Hip Hop The Culture The Movement Is Still Alive

maxresdefault (1)Some of you may know that I am one of the  host’s of grind hard radio which airs on Tuesdays and Thursdays 8 p.m. Pacific Standard Time 10 p.m. Central Time and Eastern time is at 11 p.m.

On August 10th 2017 the topic was on hip hop culture. And I’ve decided that that would be an excellent blog post to discuss. I know there’s a lot of hip-hop heads out there who keep this ever-changing movement alive. Who stick to the Hip Hop code  of raw and authentic  -real experience – unapologetic- essence of Hip Hop; TRUE HIP HOP IS ALIVE.

Let’s talk about hip hop culture… It’s  a movement through music, art, expression, and experiences. It’s a way of life putting it in simple words.

The Realms of this ever-evolving culture stem from :

graffiti paintings that tell the  story  of reality  of the lives of so many.

 

images (77)Our dance expression from…

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pop locking, popping, breakdancing, on down to the B girls and B boys. The hip hop style can’t be duplicated but often failed to be replicated because it’s a way of life and it is our lifestyle.

Our  attitude bleeds Hip Hop.

When I think of Hip Hop I think of names like:

Cowboy Wiggins from Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five  one of many pioneers:

And Afrika Bambaataa from the Zulu Nation.

Keith “Cowboy” Wiggins, a member of Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, has been credited with coining the term  in 1978 while teasing a friend who had just joined the US Army by scat singing the made-up words “hip/hop/hip/hop” in a way that mimicked the rhythmic cadence of marching soldiers. Cowboy later worked the “hip hop” cadence into his stage performance. The group frequently performed with disco artists who would refer to this new type of music by calling them “hip hoppers”. The name was originally meant as a sign of disrespect, but soon came to identify this new music and culture.

It’s funny how people don’t realize that the words through music – through anger – love – through hate or even happiness are all strong and play a part in the world OUR evolution.

A member of the Zulu Nation name Bee Stinger described Hip Hop as having six elements:

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1. Conscious awareness

2. Civil rights awareness

3. Activism awareness

4. Justice

5. Political awareness

And last but definitely the most essential is…

download (42)6. Community awareness

It has been noted and written in the history of hip-hop time that hip hop originated from English speaking blacks from Barbados who where in the South Bronx New York such as ;

Grandmaster Flash and

DJ Kool Herc

That’s the scratch of the surface in naming some of the founding fathers. These icons introduced salsa, afro conga, bongo drums, jazz, funk, ragtime, and disco by mixing samples and creating loops and breaks which later people like Grandmaster Flash , Kool Moe Dee, LL Cool J, Mc Lyte, Roxanne Shante and others would rhyme over these beats.

Herc created the blueprint for hip hop music and culture by building upon the Jamaican tradition of impromptu toasting, a spoken type of boastful poetry and speech over music.

DJs like DJ Kool herc would plug up on  1520 Sedgwick Avenue in South Bronx and play music for block parties; now this just wasn’t to have a party “Hip Hop” was created to break down the racial barriers between African Americans, Puerto Ricans, and other ethnic groups. Hip Hop is a movement of cultural and of unification. A testimony if one might say of life experiences be it your story or someone else’s story through the eyes of people in the trenches living and about that life.

The dominant focal point is that Hip Hop has moved many souls abroad. In our culture Hip Hop focuses on the issues ethnic Americans face and still continue to face today. Hip Hop took off and expanded because these very same testimonies can be related to across the globe. So the next time you’re listening to a song and you’re listening to your favorite artist that is a Hip Hop artist listen to the words…. close your eyes and then envision the story  that man or woman is trying to get across or bring to AWARENESS.

Some of the best songs our favorite songs stay timeless and revelant in our hearts and in the hearts of others because of the words Hip Hop cultivate. Hip Hop culture:  it’s a lifestyle it’s a mission and  a movement and it’s still alive.

Thanks for reading my love for Hip Hop

-MzChief Beatshop

Stop by Grind hard radio and listen to pass episodes and current episodes at http://www.grindhardradio.com where we keep hip hop alive every Tuesday and Thursday 8 p.m. Pacific Standard Time 10 p.m. central Time and 11 p.m. eastern time or you can call in at :    (323) 693-3043 press 1 to speak to team grind hard.

 

Kendrick Lamar Replaces Himself at No. 1 on Billboard + Twitter Top Tracks Chart 4/7/2017 by Trevor Anderson

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Kendrick Lamar scores his fifth No. 1 on Billboard + Twitter Top Tracks as “Humble” storms in atop the chart dated April 15, knocking his own “The Heart Part 4” from the summit. With the new No. 1, he becomes the fourth act to succeed himself at the top, following Zayn (who completed the feat twice), Justin Bieber and Ed Sheeran.

In addition to “Heart,” Lamar previously reigned on Top Tracks with “I” (one week in 2014) and his featured turns on Taylor Swift’s “Bad Blood” (three weeks in 2015) and Maroon 5’s “Don’t Wanna Know” (one week in 2016).

Billboard + Twitter Top Tracks is a weekly ranking of the most shared and/or mentioned songs on Twitter in the U.S., ranked by the volume of shares over a seven-day period (Monday to Sunday).

“Humble” and its accompanying music video premiered on March 30, and the clip has soared to more than 33.1 million global views on YouTube through April 4.

The release of two new tracks within the past two weeks had lead to speculation over an impending new album from the rapper. He ended “Heart” with the prophetic line – “Y’all got ’til April the 7th to get y’all sh*t together,” which some interpreted as a possible release date for his fourth studio set. However, on Apr. 6, an iTunes page for a new Kendrick album — titled, at least tentatively, as ALBUM — appeared, with Apr. 14 listed as the expected release date.

One last note on “Heart”: Though the song departs the Top Tracks peak, dipping 1-16, it arrives on other Billboard surveys, including a No. 11 start on Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs and a No. 22 debut on the Billboard Hot 100.

Also in the top five on Top Tracks, Cheat Codes makes its chart debut as “No Promises,” featuring Demi Lovato, arrives at No. 4. With the debut, Lovato earns her seventh top 10 hit and the first since “Body Say” last August. Cheat Codes posted the song’s official audio clip to their YouTube channel on March 30; the clip has climbed to 465,000 global clicks.

Joining the above cuts in the top 10 is The Chainsmokers‘ “The One,” which zooms to a No. 10 debut. The duo posted the song — the first track on their first-full length album Memories: Do Not Open, arriving April 7 — on Facebook on March 27. The clip has 1.9 million views on Facebook, and more than 10.5 million global plays on Spotify through April 6.

“The One” is the fifth top 10 hit for the EDM pair on the Top Tracks chart, following “Closer,” featuring Halsey (No. 1 for one week), “All We Know,” featuring Phoebe Ryan (No. 4), “Paris” (No. 5) and “Something Just Like This,” with Coldplay (No. 10).

Just underneath “The One,” Selena Gomez sprints to a No. 11 entrance on Top Tracks with “Only You,” from the soundtrack to the Netflix series 13 Reasons Why, which she co-executive produced. The tune is a cover of Yaz’s 1982 song, which reached No. 67 on the Hot 100.

Gomez’s official YouTube audio for “You,” released March 30, has clocked more than 4.2 million global plays. “You” continues a busy week on the charts for the pop singer, as her collaboration with Kygo on “It Ain’t Me” jumps 19-14 on Top Tracks and completes an identical five-spot rise (from 20-15) on the Hot 100.