Hip Hop The Culture The Movement Is Still Alive

maxresdefault (1)Some of you may know that I am one of the  host’s of grind hard radio which airs on Tuesdays and Thursdays 8 p.m. Pacific Standard Time 10 p.m. Central Time and Eastern time is at 11 p.m.

On August 10th 2017 the topic was on hip hop culture. And I’ve decided that that would be an excellent blog post to discuss. I know there’s a lot of hip-hop heads out there who keep this ever-changing movement alive. Who stick to the Hip Hop code  of raw and authentic  -real experience – unapologetic- essence of Hip Hop; TRUE HIP HOP IS ALIVE.

Let’s talk about hip hop culture… It’s  a movement through music, art, expression, and experiences. It’s a way of life putting it in simple words.

The Realms of this ever-evolving culture stem from :

graffiti paintings that tell the  story  of reality  of the lives of so many.

 

images (77)Our dance expression from…

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pop locking, popping, breakdancing, on down to the B girls and B boys. The hip hop style can’t be duplicated but often failed to be replicated because it’s a way of life and it is our lifestyle.

Our  attitude bleeds Hip Hop.

When I think of Hip Hop I think of names like:

Cowboy Wiggins from Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five  one of many pioneers:

And Afrika Bambaataa from the Zulu Nation.

Keith “Cowboy” Wiggins, a member of Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, has been credited with coining the term  in 1978 while teasing a friend who had just joined the US Army by scat singing the made-up words “hip/hop/hip/hop” in a way that mimicked the rhythmic cadence of marching soldiers. Cowboy later worked the “hip hop” cadence into his stage performance. The group frequently performed with disco artists who would refer to this new type of music by calling them “hip hoppers”. The name was originally meant as a sign of disrespect, but soon came to identify this new music and culture.

It’s funny how people don’t realize that the words through music – through anger – love – through hate or even happiness are all strong and play a part in the world OUR evolution.

A member of the Zulu Nation name Bee Stinger described Hip Hop as having six elements:

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1. Conscious awareness

2. Civil rights awareness

3. Activism awareness

4. Justice

5. Political awareness

And last but definitely the most essential is…

download (42)6. Community awareness

It has been noted and written in the history of hip-hop time that hip hop originated from English speaking blacks from Barbados who where in the South Bronx New York such as ;

Grandmaster Flash and

DJ Kool Herc

That’s the scratch of the surface in naming some of the founding fathers. These icons introduced salsa, afro conga, bongo drums, jazz, funk, ragtime, and disco by mixing samples and creating loops and breaks which later people like Grandmaster Flash , Kool Moe Dee, LL Cool J, Mc Lyte, Roxanne Shante and others would rhyme over these beats.

Herc created the blueprint for hip hop music and culture by building upon the Jamaican tradition of impromptu toasting, a spoken type of boastful poetry and speech over music.

DJs like DJ Kool herc would plug up on  1520 Sedgwick Avenue in South Bronx and play music for block parties; now this just wasn’t to have a party “Hip Hop” was created to break down the racial barriers between African Americans, Puerto Ricans, and other ethnic groups. Hip Hop is a movement of cultural and of unification. A testimony if one might say of life experiences be it your story or someone else’s story through the eyes of people in the trenches living and about that life.

The dominant focal point is that Hip Hop has moved many souls abroad. In our culture Hip Hop focuses on the issues ethnic Americans face and still continue to face today. Hip Hop took off and expanded because these very same testimonies can be related to across the globe. So the next time you’re listening to a song and you’re listening to your favorite artist that is a Hip Hop artist listen to the words…. close your eyes and then envision the story  that man or woman is trying to get across or bring to AWARENESS.

Some of the best songs our favorite songs stay timeless and revelant in our hearts and in the hearts of others because of the words Hip Hop cultivate. Hip Hop culture:  it’s a lifestyle it’s a mission and  a movement and it’s still alive.

Thanks for reading my love for Hip Hop

-MzChief Beatshop

Stop by Grind hard radio and listen to pass episodes and current episodes at http://www.grindhardradio.com where we keep hip hop alive every Tuesday and Thursday 8 p.m. Pacific Standard Time 10 p.m. central Time and 11 p.m. eastern time or you can call in at :    (323) 693-3043 press 1 to speak to team grind hard.

 

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Katie Got Bandz (Top Female Rappers )

Katie is from Bronzeville, a neighborhood in the Low End area of South Side, Chicago. Katie cites her neighborhood as the muse for her lyrics and the stories she tells while rapping. Her favorite rapper is Waka Flocka Flame and, prior to rapping, she studied biology and pre-med at Truman College.

 

Musical career

 

Katie is the debut female rapper of Chicago’s drill music scene, though she has announced plans to transition her music to a more global sound. In several interviews she spoke of the poor reputation Chicago has with respect to crime and violence and the attack of drill music as a result. Katie has said that her intention with drill music is to portray her authentic experience and emphasizes she does not want to influence crime or contribute to the already high crime rate in Chicago through her music.

 

Her upcoming project Drillary Clinton 3 is slated for a late 2015 release, and she intends to transition her sound with this project while paying homage to drill music at the same time.

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Mc Trouble ( Top Female Rappers )

LaTasha Sheron Rogers (July 30, 1970 – June 4, 1992), better known as MC Trouble, was a rap artist, and the first female rapper signed to Motown Records.

 

MC Trouble had a minor hit with the song “(I Wanna) Make You Mine” featuring The Good Girls, released May 25, 1990. “Make You Mine” peaked at #15 on the Billboard Magazine’s Hot Rap Songs charts.

 

The title track of her debut album Gotta Get a Grip was released as a second single on September 14, 1990. Gotta Get a Grip showed promise as a mix of hardcore rap and more commercial R&B.

 

Illness and death

 

Rogers was born with epilepsy and received daily treatment to prevent seizures; In 1992, she was in production for her second album when she died in her sleep on June 4, 1992, while at the home of a friend in Los Angeles shortly after suffering an epileptic seizure which resulted in heart failure.

 

Legacy

 

The posthumous single “Big Ole Jazz” was released in 1992 and appeared on the House Party 2 soundtrack resulted in a second & final hit on Billboard’s rap singles chart. The song ‘Vibes and Stuff’ by rap group A Tribe Called Quest off their album The Low End Theory was dedicated to MC Trouble. Her dedication is mentioned several times throughout the track.

“Lady ” (New Top Female Rappers )

Shameka Shanta Brown (born July 31, 1989), better known by her stage name Lady (and her online accounts ThisIsLady), is an American rapper signed to Plies’ record label, Big Gates Record. Lady was born in Talbotton, Georgia and began rapping in high school with two of her friends. She was signed to her record label on the first of April, 2010. She has currently released three albums.

 

Lady’s song “Yankin” was featured in the HBO television series Girls  and her song “Twerk” was featured in Showtime’s original television series Ray Donovan.  Lady’s songs have also been featured on other shows and websites, such as the BBC show Skins, Slate, Perez Hilton, Howard Stern Show, MTV,Examiner.com, and The Huffington Post.

 

Early Life

 

Brown graduated from Central High School in Talbotton, Georgia. During her senior year at Central, Brown was the Senior class officer president.

 

Career Beginnings

 

On April 1st 2010, Brown signed a record deal with the indie recording label, Big Gates Records. With more than 100,000 digital sales, the mixtapes “Bitch From Around the Way”, “Bitch From Around the Way II”, and “Bout Dat Life” have increased Lady’s popularity.

 

HBO’s hit series, “Girls”, featured Lady’s track “Yankin,” while the UK’s Channel 4 award-winning show “Skins” used her track “I Need” for the series. Showtime’s Ray Donovan featured “twerk”. Lady and her songs have also been discussed on Howard Stern’s radio talk show, the Howard Stern Show.

 

“Katie Got Bandz” (Top Female Rappers )

Katie is from Bronzeville, a neighborhood in the Low End area of South Side, Chicago. Katie cites her neighborhood as the muse for her lyrics and the stories she tells while rapping. Her favorite rapper is Waka Flocka Flame and, prior to rapping, she studied biology and pre-med at Truman College.

 

Musical career

 

Katie is the debut female rapper of Chicago’s drill music scene, though she has announced plans to transition her music to a more global sound. In several interviews she spoke of the poor reputation Chicago has with respect to crime and violence and the attack of drill music as a result. Katie has said that her intention with drill music is to portray her authentic experience and emphasizes she does not want to influence crime or contribute to the already high crime rate in Chicago through her music.

 

Her upcoming project Drillary Clinton 3 is slated for a late 2015 release, and she intends to transition her sound with this project while paying homage to drill music at the same time.

Dej Loaf (Top Female Rappers

Deja Trimble (born April 8, 1991), better known by her stage name Dej Loaf (stylized as DeJ Loaf), is an American rapper and singer from Detroit, Michigan. She began her music career in 2011, and released her debut mixtape Just Do It in 2012. In October 2014, she released her second mixtape, Sell Sole.

 

DeJ Loaf rose to greater popularity in 2014 with her single “Try Me”, which initially attained viral internet popularity and has peaked at number 45 on the US Billboard Hot 100. The song was certified Gold on April 3, 2015 in the US.

 

She was chosen as part of the XXL Magazine2015 Freshman Class.

 

Early life

 

Deja Trimble was born on April 8, 1991 in Detroit, Michigan and was raised on the Eastside of the city. Growing up, she often listened to music with her parents and grandmother, ranging “from 2Pac to Rakim to Miles Davis.”

 

Her father was killed when she was four years old. A self-described “good kid and a decent student” who mostly kept to herself, she began writing her own original music as early as nine years old.

 

She graduated from Southeastern High School in Detroit, MI in 2009, played basketball up to the junior varsity level, and later attended Saginaw Valley State University to study nursing for three semesters before deciding to focus on a full-time music career.

 

Music career

 

Dej Loaf began her career as a hip hop artist in 2011; her stage name is a portmanteau of a shortened version of her first name, “Deja”, and “loafer”, as she took a keen interest in Air Jordans growing up.

 

She released her first mixtape, Just Do It., in 2013, which attracted the attention of fellow Detroit rapper SAYITAINTTONE. She later signed her to his label IBGM (I Been Gettin’ Money) and his management team.

 

The track “Try Me”, produced by DDS, and released as a single in July 2014, rose to viral popularity after Canadian recording artist Drake quoted lyrics from the song in an Instagram post. She signed to Columbia Records in October and shortly after released the mixtape Sell Sole,  which was given an “A–” by music critic Robert Christgau, who wrote in his review for Noisey, “What’s irresistible is the form-content disparity—a rapper who brags so un-macho, a rapper whose greed is so explicitly for her family, a rapper who’s ‘Grindin’ ‘ at music. Plus her flow is a brook, her producer respects her space, and her two sex rhymes are into it and into it more.”

 

DeJ Loaf contributed a rap to the song “Detroit vs. Everybody” on rapper Eminem’s compilation Shady XV (2014). She opened for Nicki Minaj during the North American leg of The Pinkprint Tour in 2015.